The Native and Everyday Projects Mentorship Program 2018-2020

The Mentors:

The Native and Everyday Projects mentors are award-winning professional photographers and editors from around the world. Our team includes industry experts working and shooting for publications and organizations such as National Geographic, The New York Times, the Washington Post, TIME, the Associated Press, and many others. They include recipients of World Press Photo awards, Pictures of the Year and Pictures of the Year Latam awards, Days Japan International Photojournalism awards, the Getty Instagram grant, Magnum Foundation grants, Pulitzer Center grants, and numerous other awards, as well as members and co-founders of NOOR and VII.

 
 
 Adriana Zehbrauskas

Adriana Zehbrauskas

Adriana Zehbrauskas

Adriana Zehbrauskas is a Brazilian documentary photographer based in Mexico City.  Her work is largely focused on issues related to religion, migration, and the violence resulting from the drug trades in Mexico and Central America. Zehbrauskas splits her time between personal projects and assignment work for regular clients such as The New York Times, UNICEF, BuzzFeed News, and Folha de S. Paulo, among others.
 
Her work has been highlighted in the documentary “Beyond Assignment” and recent awards include the Getty Images Instagram Grant for her work documenting underrepresented communities in Mexico.
 
She’s an instructor with the Foundry Photojournalism Workshop, the World Press Photo Foundation, the International Center of Photography and FNPI (Fundación Gabriel García Márquez Para El Nuevo Periodismo IberoAmericano.) Recent lectures include Alexia’s Foundation Seminar “Latin America: Stories That Drive Change” (Miami, 2017), Premio y Festival Gabo de Periodismo “Journalism in Transformation (Medellin, Colombia, 2016), and El Foro Cap’s “Women in Journalism” (San Salvador, El Salvador, 2016.)
 
Her “Family Matters” project has been shown at The Fence at Photoville (NY, 2017); Teachers College at Columbia University (NY, 2107); The Half King (NY, 2016); Galeria Malafama (Mexico City 2016); and, Centro Cultural Metropolitano (Quito, Ecuador, 2016.)
 


 Alice Gabriner

Alice Gabriner

Alice Gabriner

Alice Gabriner is a photography editor with 30 years experience covering national and international news at publications, including The New York Times, National Geographic, and TIME, where she was the international photo editor from 2014 until November 2017.  

Gabriner led TIME's photo department during the 2008-2009 election and inauguration of President Barack Obama and oversaw the magazine’s award winning coverage of the Iraq War. For the first two years of the Obama administration, she served as Deputy Director of Photography.  
Gabriner has received multiple editing prizes from the Pictures of the Year (POYi) competition. The photographers she has worked with have been recognized with National Magazine Awards (ASME), the ICP Infinity Award, the Visa d'or, World Press Photo, and Pictures of the Year International prizes. Gabriner has curated photography exhibits, edited books, lectured, and has been a member of numerous photo juries, workshops, and portfolio reviews worldwide.
 


 Allison Shelley

Allison Shelley


Allison Shelley

Allison Shelley is a documentary photographer focused on women’s justice issues worldwide.  Her her work is regularly featured in publications such as: National Geographic, The New York Times, and The Guardian.  She is co-founder of the non-profit Women Photojournalists of Washington (WPOW) and has worked as director of photography for Education Week newspaper and as staff photographer for The Washington Times. 

 Andrew Esiebo

Andrew Esiebo

Andrew Esiebo

Andrew Esiebo is a visual storyteller from Lagos, Nigeria, who began his career in photography chronicling the rapid development of urban Nigeria as well as the country's rich culture and heritage. His work focuses on themes such as: sexuality, gender politics, football, popular culture, migration, religion, and spirituality.

His work has been exhibited at the São Paulo Biennial-Brazil, Biennale Cuvee in Linz-Austria, Photo Quai biennials in Paris-France, Dakar Biennale-Senegal, Guangzhou Triennial in Beijing-China, the Chobi Mela V Photo Festival in Bangladesh, Havana Biennial in Havana, Cuba, Noorderlicht Photo Festival in the Netherlands, African Photography Encounters in Bamako-Mali, and the Lagos Photo Festival among others.

He is a winner of the 2011 Musee du Quai Branly Artistic creation prize. In 2010, he was selected for the Road to Twenty Ten projects to form a Dream Team of 16 African journalists and photographers providing alternative stories from the World Cup in South Africa.

His attention to social issues has led him to work for several local and international institutions, including The King’s College London, University of Padova, Italy, National Geographic, The Photographers Gallery, London, Action Aids, WHO, UNICEF, Women for Women, MSH Nigeria, and several others.

His work has been published in books, magazines, and online in outlets such as New York Times, Courrier International, Le Point, Le Monde magazine, Financial Times, The Guardian UK, Marie Claire Italia, Time Out Nigeria, Mail & Guardian online, Laia Books, Geo-Lino, KIT, CNN, Al Jazeera, and the African style magazine, Arise.

He is currently based in Nigeria. 
 


 Andrew Katz

Andrew Katz

Andrew Katz

Andrew Katz is TIME’s Deputy Director of Multimedia, overseeing international photography and helping to manage visual coverage. This is a print-digital-social role that involves assigning photographers around the world, producing visual features, and curating the @TIME Instagram feed. He closely collaborates with the editorial, art, video, and development teams. Since 2012, he has worked in all corners of the TIME newsroom: as a reporter, homepage editor, news editor, and international multimedia editor. In 2015, he briefly served as the foreign and national security digital editor at the Washington Post. He is a 2012 graduate of Columbia Journalism School.


 Brent Lewis

Brent Lewis

Brent Lewis

Brent is the Senior Photo Editor of ESPN’s The Undefeated, where he drives the visual language of the website that is based around intersection of sports, race and culture. Before joining the Dark Side, he was a staff photojournalist at The Denver Post covering the vast land of Colorado and the Rocky Mountain Region. 
 
Through the years, his photos have been used by the Chicago Tribune, L.A. Times, Associated Press, Forbes and Yahoo! News as well as in the RedEye, MetroMix and in the Chicago Reporter.
 
Lewis’s grandfather first sparked his interest in photography when he loaned him a Minolta SR-7 and three lenses while Brent was studying Electrical Engineering at Northern Illinois University. But then he joined the staff at Northern Illinois University’s student newspaper, the Northern Star, and quickly became one of their star photographers, regularly producing quality images.

Once Lewis decided to follow his passion and become a full-time photojournalist, he transferred to Columbia College Chicago. At the Columbia Chronicle, the weekly student newspaper, he established himself as a go-to for all assignments whether they were sports, political events, spot news, or just a feature to fill up a page. Brent lives in Washington D.C. with his wife, Jasmine, son, Koa, and dog, London McGillicutty. 
 


 Donald Weber

Donald Weber

Donald Weber

Prior to photography, Donald Weber originally trained as an architect and worked with Rem Koolhaas in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Weber is the author of four photography books. Interrogations, about post-Soviet authority in Ukraine and Russia, has gone on to much acclaim and was selected to be included in Martin Parr and Gerry Badger’s seminal The Photobook: A History, Volume III. Weber’s latest book, War Sand, explores D-Day as told through a grain of sand. He is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Lange-Taylor Prize, the Duke and Duchess of York Prize, two World Press Photo Awards, and shortlisted for the Scotiabank Photography Prize. He serves on the faculty of the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague, The Netherlands.


 Edward Echwalu

Edward Echwalu

Edward Echwalu

Edward Echwalu is a photojournalist based in Kampala, Uganda, focusing on stories across the African continent. He has covered major news and has documented stories of conflict and development across Africa, such as: healthcare provisions in Uganda and road safety. He has worked as a freelancer for Reuters News Agency, The Daily Monitor, and The Observer Newspaper. 
 
Echwalu has received numerous local and international photojournalism awards, such as: 1st Runner Up in the 2012 CNN African Journalist of the Year Awards. He was also a recipient of Uganda’s coveted student Photojournalism prize, The Cranimer Mugerwa Photojournalism Award, in 2009.
 
Echwalu is a member of Everyday Africa, a stellar group of African-based photographers seeking to change the ever-negative perception of Africa across the world by documenting everyday positive life across the continent.


 James Estrin

James Estrin

James Estrin

James Estrin is a Senior Staff Photographer for the New York Times. He is also a co-editor of  the Times's photography platform, Lens, with David Gonzalez. Estrin has worked for the Times since 1987 and was part of a Pulitzer Prize winning team in 2001.  
 
Estrin is also the co-executive producer of the Emmy nominated documentary film "Underfire: The Untold Story of Pfc. Tony Vaccaro," which appeared on HBO in 2016.  He teaches widely and is an adjunct professor at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism. 


 Jennifer Samuel

Jennifer Samuel

Jennifer Samuel

Jennifer Pritheeva Samuel has worked on visual media and fine art projects that probe socio-political issues for over fifteen years. She is currently an Associate Photo Editor at National Geographic magazine. 
 
Prior to that she was Photoville’s Producer of Public Talks & Workshops and the Associate Director of Anastasia Photo gallery. She was the founder and producer of Visionaries, a roving series of public artist programs hosted by collaborating partners such as The Queens Museum of Art, Photoville, and DeKalb Market. 
 
She was a Co-Founder and Curator of the Brooklyn Photo Salon, a lively quarterly community gathering bringing together emerging and established photographers to commune, critique, and view photography. Prior to being the Studio Manager for the artist Hank Willis Thomas, she was an Associate Producer on several films that aired on PBS Frontline, Independent Lens, POV, and BBC, covering a wide range of topics including climate change, race and education, and Hurricane Katrina.
 
Jennifer studied Anthropology and Photography at New York University and was subsequently a Peace Corps volunteer on the island of Dominica. She received her Master of International Affairs from Columbia University’s School of International & Public Affairs with a focus on Economic Development and Media.
 


 John Stanmeyer © Rob Becker 

John Stanmeyer © Rob Becker 

John Stanmeyer

John Stanmeyer is an award-winning photojournalist, Emmy-nominated filmmaker and field recordist dedicated to social and political issues that define our times.

For more than a decade, Stanmeyer has worked nearly exclusively with National Geographic magazine, producing over 17 stories for the magazine resulting in more than 10 covers. Between 1998 and 2008, John was a contract photographer for TIME magazine. His years with TIME resulted in 18 covers. In 2001, Stanmeyer cofound with six of the world’s leading photojournalists the VII Photo agency.

Stanmeyer is represented by Nat Geo Creative agency and is an Emeritus member of the VII. He is the recipient of numerous honors, including the prestigious Robert Capa award, Pictures of the Year International, Magazine Photographer of the Year and the World Press Photo of the Year in 2014. 


 Michael Robinson Chávez

Michael Robinson Chávez

Michael Robinson Chávez

Michael Robinson Chávez became seduced by photography after a friend gave him a camera before a three-month trip to Peru in 1988. 

A native Californian and half Peruvian, Robinson Chávez is currently on his second tour as a staff photographer at The Washington Post. Prior to that, he worked for The Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, and the Associated Press. 

He has covered assignments in over 60 countries including violence in Mexico, the historic drought in California, tsunamis in Indonesia and Chile, the Egyptian revolution, life in India and Brazil’s slums, gold mining in Peru, the 2006 Hezbollah/Israeli war, and the US-led invasion and occupation of Iraq.
Robinson Chávez is a two-time winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Photojournalism and was named second place Photographer of the Year by Pictures of the Year International in 2010 and 2014. He has received awards from the Best of Photojournalism, the Chinese Photojournalist Society, the Scripps Howard Foundation, Society of Newspaper Design, and the White House News Photographer’s Association. 

His work has been exhibited widely, including the Visa Pour l'image festival in France, the Head On Photo Festival in Sydney, the Corcoran Gallery in Washington DC, The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Centro de Imagen in Lima, Peru, Imagenes Havana in Cuba, and War Photo Limited in Dubrovnik among others.
He is currently working on a book of photographs from Peru entitled “Awaiting the Rain,” which will be published in 2018. In addition, he teaches and lectures at workshops and photo festivals throughout the world.
 


 Nick Kirkpatrick

Nick Kirkpatrick

Nick Kirkpatrick

Nick Kirkpatrick is the foreign photo editor at The Washington Post. Before joining The Post, Nick was a freelance multimedia journalist based in Washington D.C. He is a graduate of the Corcoran College of Art + Design, The Danish School of Journalism, and was a student at the Eddie Adams Workshop. Nick has served on the jury for the Military Photographer of the Year contest and the Visa d’Or awards for news and feature reporting at Visa pour l'Image international photojournalism festival. Last year he received an award of excellence in the visual newspaper editor of the year category at Pictures of the Year International. Currently, Nick is on leave from the foreign desk for a few months working on a mobile-first visual storytelling initiative.


 Olivier Laurent

Olivier Laurent

Olivier Laurent

Olivier Laurent is an International Photo Editor at The Washington Post, working with the organization’s growing network of foreign correspondents and contributors. He also partners with the Post's social team on photo-driven initiatives and contributes to InSight, the Post’s photography section.

He was previously the Editor of LightBox, TIME's photography website, which provided a window into the process of how great photographs are made, and drew attention to inspiring projects and groundbreaking work by established masters and new pioneers. 

Previously, he was the Associate Editor for British Journal of Photography, the world’s longest-running photography magazine established in 1854, and the Editor of FLTR, the first weekly magazine on smartphone photography.

He has sat on the juries of the Visa pour l'Image Web Documentary Award, the Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Prize, the FotoEvidence First Photobook Award, the Getty Images
 


 Oscar B. Castillo 

Oscar B. Castillo 

Oscar B. Castillo

Oscar Castillo was born in Caracas, Venezuela in 1981. He studied psychology at the Venezuelan Central University.  His professional work as a photographer started shortly afterwards and has been geared towards social subjects that promote ideas of solidarity, tolerance, and respect with an aim for his camera to be an extension of his vision of humanity.

Castillo has taught photographic workshops to children from marginalized communities in Mexico, youngsters in IDPs camps in post-earthquake Haiti, and to inmates inside Venezuelan prisons. Castillo has also taught educational programs in Colombia, Argentina, and Venezuela amongst others and regularly collaborates with the Foundry Photojournalism Workshop. He has also participated in various talks and conferences about ethics in photography and his personal projects about Venezuela’s cycle of violence in Norway, Colombia, Spain,and the USA.

His work has been published by TIME Magazine, TIME Lightbox, The New York Times, NYT International, Leica Magazine, Foreign Policy, NZZ, the L.A Times, Der Spiegel, Days Japan, Helsinki Sanomat, Internazionale, and Slate Magazine among others. His work has been exhibited in Angkor Festival in Cambodia, Noorderlicht Festival in The Netherlands, Festival della Fotografia Etica in Italy, Visa pour l’image in France and the Lumix Festival in Hannover, Germany as well as in Austria, Cuba, the USA, and Colombia. Recently Castillo’s coverage of Venezuelan socio-political fractures was recognized by a Eugene Smith Fellowship in 2016 and by Picture of the Year Latin America in 2015. 

He’s a 2014 Emergency Fund grantee by Magnum Foundation and a 2016 On Religion Program grantee by Magnum Foundation to work on the situation of Islam in France. Castillo is an alum  of the Eddie Adams Workshop XXVI where he was awarded the Tim Hetherington Special Award.

Castillo currently lives and works in between France and Barcelona where he follows the movement for independence in Catalonia. He frequently travels back to Venezuela to follow the current chaotic panorama of Venezuela and plans to publish a photography book featuring six years of covering the causes and consequences of violence and political confrontation in his home country.
 


 Peter DiCampo

Peter DiCampo

Peter DiCampo

Peter DiCampo is a freelance photojournalist and co-founder of the acclaimed Everyday Africa project. He began his career while a Peace Corps Volunteer living in rural Ghana and has been working primarily in Africa for over a decade, reporting for the world’s leading publications while also working on long-term projects focused on international development and energy access. 

In his role as co-founder of Everyday Africa, he is a contributing photographer, writer, curator, classroom curriculum designer, and co-editor of their book, published by Kehrer Verlag in 2017. He is the recipient of grants and awards from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Magnum Foundation, Brown Institute for Media Innovation, Open Society Foundations, and Pictures of the Year International, among many others, and was among the first recipients of the ImpactAFRICA grant for data journalism in 2017. 

His photography has been exhibited internationally, including solo exhibitions at galleries in New York, London, and Rio de Janeiro, and his work has appeared in National Geographic, Newsweek, TIME, The New York Times, Foreign Policy, Vanity Fair, The Wall Street Journal, and many more. He has served on award juries and nomination committees, including the first ever AddisFotoFest Awards in 2016. 

Peter holds a BS in Journalism from Boston University. He is based between Seattle and Nairobi, Kenya.
 


 Ricci Shryock

Ricci Shryock

Ricci Shryock

Ricci Shryock is a photographer and journalist who has worked in West Africa since 2008. From her base in Dakar, Senegal, she has covered a wide range of issues including Ebola, the ongoing migration crisis, street style, and women’s health with her work published in The New Yorker, Der Spiegel, Vogue Italia, and Buzzfeed, among others. Open Society awarded her honorable mention for her work on the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in their “Ebola Through The Lens” contest. Shryock is also a contributor to Everyday Africa and many of her images were included in the group’s first book, published in 2017. She has been awarded grants by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and the International Women’s Media Foundation. She teaches photojournalism at the University of Dakar and has conducted multiple journalism trainings throughout the continent of Africa. 


 Shahidul Alam

Shahidul Alam

Shahidul Alam

Shahidul Alam is a photographer, writer, curator, and activist, obtaining a PhD in chemistry before switching to photography. Returning to Dhaka, Bangladesh in 1984, he documented the democratic struggle to remove General Ershad. A former president of the Bangladesh Photographic Society, Alam set up the award-winning Drik agency, the Bangladesh Photographic Institute, the Chobi Mela festival, the Majority World agency, and Pathshala, the South Asian Media Institute, which is considered one of the finest schools of photography in the world.

Alam’s work has been exhibited in MOMA New York, Centre Georges Pompidou Paris, Royal Albert Hall, Tate Modern London, and the Museum of Contemporary Arts Tehran. He has been a guest curator of Whitechapel Gallery, Winterthur Gallery, National Art Gallery Malaysia, Musee de Quai Branly, and Brussels Biennale. His numerous photographic awards include: the Howard Chapnick Grant, the Open Society Institute Audience Engagement Grant and Shilpakala Padak. His show “Best Years of My Life” was the central exhibit at the
Global Forum for Migration and Development in Berlin and the Global Media Forum in Bonn. 

His recent work “Embracing the Other” on Islamophobia and Extremism was shown to international acclaim at the Bait Ur Rouf mosque. He was the international guest curator for the Auckland Festival in New Zealand and was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Dali Festival in China in 2017. He will be curating a major show on Bangladeshi art at the Photo Museo Cuatro Caminos in Mexico City in 2018.

Alam has been a jury member in prestigious international photography contests, including World Press Photo, which he chaired, and Prix Pictet, which was chaired by Kofi Anan.

In 2009, Alam was commissioned by the Nelson Mandela Foundation to take what turned out to be the last official portrait of Nelson Mandela. An active blogger and a new media pioneer, Alam introduced email to Bangladesh in the early nineties.


 Shaminder Dulai

Shaminder Dulai

Shaminder Dulai

Shaminder Dulai is a storyteller who specializes in not being a jerk. He is an award-winning photo and video journalist with 20 years of experience producing compelling content in newsrooms across the United States. He strives to create images that live beyond the daily news cycle and believes the world isn't a simple binary.

Over his career, he has worked at every level, from daily staffer to DOP, and in every form of visual storytelling from print to digital, from newspapers and magazines to start-ups and broadcast TV.

He is currently the Managing Editor for NBC Left Field, an experimental long-form documentary unit within the broadcaster. Formerly, he was Global Director of Photography and Multimedia for Newsweek magazine, where he founded Newsweek Films, NWPhotoLab, curated its Instagram, and was responsible for all visuals from print to digital and moved the needle for visual journalism. His efforts earned him back-to-back wins for Best Use of Photography and third place for Photo Editor of the Year.

His work has spanned three continents and appeared on the cover of Newsweek, NBC, The Daily Beast, MSNBC, The Houston Chronicle, Mother Jones, The UK Guardian, Vibe Magazine, International Center of Photography, and The Washington Post among others
 


 Stephen Mayes

Stephen Mayes

Stephen Mayes

Stephen Mayes is Executive Director of the Tim Hetherington Trust. He has managed the work and careers of top-level photographers and artists in the diverse areas of art, fashion, photojournalism, and commercial photography for over 25 years. As a creative director and CEO, he has written successful business plans and reshaped operations for American, Asian, and European imaging companies. 
 
Mayes was the Creative Director of Eyes Storm, working with artists such as Damien Hirst, Ed Ruscha, and Richard Misrach. As Director of the Image Archive with Art + Commerce, he represented the archives of Robert Mapplethorpe, Steven Meisel, David LaChapelle, and others. He was part of the founding management team of Getty Images and his work as SVP and Group Creative Director helped to launch the company as the world’s commercially most successful image supplier. 

He has deep experience in world-shaping photojournalism as the Director of Network Photographers in London and, most recently, as the CEO of VII in New York, which are both high-profile co-operatives of leading photojournalists. From 2004 to 2012, he took an annual assignment as Secretary to the World Press Photo competition in Amsterdam. 
 
Often described as a “futurist,” Mayes has broadcast, taught, and written extensively about the ethics and practice of photography.
 


 Tanya Habjouqa

Tanya Habjouqa

Tanya Habjouqa

Tanya Habjouqa is a Jordanian photographer and educator who produces in-depth narratives that offer nuanced alternatives to mainstream media depictions of people. Her work is born out of long-term investments and collaborative methodology, blending ethnographic research and reportage. Habjouqa is a member of NOO and is represented by East Wing and ILEX galleries. She exhibits worldwide and is in the permanent collections of MFA Boston, Institut du Monde Arab, and the Carnegie Museum of Art. 
 
A founding member of Rawiya, she mentors with the groundbreaking educational initiative Arab Documentary Photography Program. She approaches her subjects with sensitivity but also with an eye for the absurd. Her long-term projects focus on gender, representations of otherness, dispossession, and the ever-shifting sociopolitical dynamics in The Middle East. Her photography book Occupied Pleasures was heralded by TIME magazine and Smithsonian as one of the best photo books of 2015 (winning her a World Press Photo award in 2014). She is based in East Jerusalem and holds a MA in Middle East Politics and Communications from SOAS London.


Walter.Astrada.jpg

Walter Astrada

Walter Astrada began his career as a staff photographer at La Nación. He later joined the Associated Press (AP) in Bolivia, Argentina, Paraguay, and the Dominican Republic. He worked as a freelancer for Agence France Presse (AFP) in the Dominican Republic from 2005 to 2006, and was represented and distributed by World Picture News.
 
During 2008 and 2009, he covered East Africa from his base in Uganda. He works as a freelancers focusing on long-term projects. Astrada also gives lectures and workshops on photojournalism, documentary photography, and filmmaking.
 
He’s been the recipient of three World Press Photo awards, The Bayeux-Calvados award for War Correspondents, NPPA-BOP as ‘Photojournalist of the Year’ and ‘Best of Show,’ PGB as ‘Photographer of the Year’ and ‘Picture of the Year,’ PDN annual, Days Japan 1st Prize, POYi, Alfred I. du Pont Award for Excellence in Broadcast and Digital Journalism and the Alexia Foundation and Getty Editorial grants, among others.
 
He is currently traveling on a Royal Enfield aiming to do a world tour that began in Barcelona, Spain, on May 1st, 2015.